Custom hard bound laptop case

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In a previous life, I used to create hand-bound books, though I have not had the chance to use those skills in a long time.  But in looking around on the internet for a case for my new laptop, I couldn’t find anything I liked.  Book Book came close, though, but I didn’t like the price, and the style was not quite right.  Nothing a trip to the local art supply store couldn’t fix.

$25 later, I had most of the supplies I needed (the rest hiding in a box at home) to create my own custom laptop case.  Using traditional bookmaking techniques, a few bandaids, and the fitted book boxes here as inspiration, I made this:

It’s not perfect (is version 1.0 ever?) but it protects it very nicely when I am carrying it around the house or at the café.  There are even tabs holding it to the screen, so you can open it up and use it without removing the case

As an added bonus, if you put it in a bookcase full of hardbound books, it practically disappears…

Delightfully Material

Fahrenheit 451, Matchstick
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Jerry Bates:

Books are truly things of beauty…

Originally posted on Pixel & Pilcrow:

Ebooks are always made of pixels. Variety is provided by their ability to be interactive, to move and change and react. But there isn’t much variety in the actual material of ebooks. Physical books, on the other hand, have the freedom to experiment a little bit more. And as more focus turns to the physical book as an objet d’art, designers are having more fun with their materials.

Here’s some  fun, inspiring examples of book designers thinking outside the box:

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

Fahrenheit 451, Matchstick

Designed by Elizabeth Perez (see her portfolio), who describes her simple design: “The book’s spine is screen-printed with a matchbook striking paper surface, so the book itself can be burned.” I especially like this because it almost challenges the reader to burn the book, which is a disturbing idea, and in doing so really uses material to make the book’s ideas come to life.

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